The Evolving Book
Socratic and Platonic Political Philosophy: Practicing a Politics of Reading
The Liberal Arts (Image: The Seven Liberal Arts, by Guidi, 1406-86)
The Public Philosophy Journal team at Matrix at MSU, Spring 2014.
The Administrative Life

Featured Post

  • By the summer of 1954, the students at Penn State had grown impatient. The world had settled into a Cold War, the nuclear arms race threatened total annihilation, and the students felt unprepared to address the urgent demands of the complex international situation into which they would graduate.

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Recent Post from the Long Road

  • At the beginning of the Physics, Aristotle captures something of the essence of the liberal arts and sciences as an endeavor. This path from the surface of things to a deeper understanding of their nature is the common root of all disciplines in the liberal arts and sciences; it is the passage from a superficial encounter with the environment to a more substantive engagement with the complexity of the world we inhabit.

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Recent Post from the Digital Vita

Recent Post from the Digital Dialogue

  • In episode 71 we are joined by John Jasso, Assistant Professor of English at Penn State. Our conversation focuses on what Jasso calls Plato’s Psychagogic Rhetoric, a phrase that suggests the manner in which Plato deployed (or had Socrates deploy) rhetorical strategies designed to move souls.

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